Tag Archives: diabetes

RD Web Presence – A Valuable Thing

I have always had a passion for social media and information technology, which is no surprise if you have followed my blog or know my background!  Communicating with the public online is something I really enjoy.

Having a website, blog, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc can be a lot of work to maintain (especially when you have a full-time job, too!)  however it can really pay off.  For example, I was contacted by a company called AD Medical, or America’s Dietitians, which is in Chicago.  One of their employees in the communications department stumbled upon my website and blog, and took the time to contact me directly.  He asked if I would be interested in writing a guest blog for his company’s brand new website.

Just some background – AD Medical works primarily with those on Medicare and with diabetes.  Their new website provides information for both clients and health care providers.  Their new blog, BlogAbetic, offers a more interactive feature for clients to learn tips on healthy living.

I was really excited to be featured as the first blogger featured on BlogAbetic after they debuted their brand-new website.  I definitely hope to work with them more in the future!

Check out my entry – Color Your Plate, Improve Your Health!

Having a website, blog, and various social media platforms have given me many other opportunities as well, such as career advice, notification of available jobs/volunteer work, and even an offer for free RD exam study materials!  Plus, when you apply to a job, all you have to do is refer them to your portfolio to find all the information they’d ever want.

It may seem like a lot of work to maintain a web presence, but don’t give up.  For example, my blog had very few views when I first started, but now I get more than I ever initially expected!

How has social media and web presence helped you in your career/education?

Moving Along

At work

Entering/reviewing patient notes in the computer

I still can’t believe it’s October. Where has the time gone? I’ve been seeing tons of patients at the hospital. As my sister puts it, “saving the world” except, not. Just trying to optimize people’s dietary intake is all.  I’ve seen a lot of cancer patients who need supplemental shakes to boost their caloric/protein intake, and many cardiac patients who need to cut back on their caloric/fat intake.  Even when the doctors ignore my recommendations, I know that I’m still making an impact when I am able to spend time with the patients and really  work with them.  There’s also been a couple quite remarkable cases that I feel I would be violating patient confidentiality if I posted about, but let’s just say it’s been pretty interesting!

Monday was a class day where we learned about FSNE, or Maryland’s Food Supplement Nutrition Education program, commonly referred to as Food Stamp education.  We will be doing an in-depth research project for them evaluating their educational curriculums for people who are receiving food supplement aid.  We also were able to learn about tips on general nutrition education practices.  Food stamps reach a lot of different populations, so you never can predict how a class will go.  Several nutrition educators for FSNE were in attendance, so they were able to offer ideas on how to cope with various situations.

Anyway, tomorrow I will be going to the hospital really early to hear a recognized expert on diabetes talk about diabetes and heart disease.  It should be interesting to hear about, since so many of my patients have both of those conditions!  For now, I must work on my Critical Care homework set.  I’ll try to update again later this week!

Getting into the Swing of Things

It’s nearing the end of the second week and I’m learning so much!  Yesterday I performed a diet history with a diabetes patient, and today I did two more.  We do this to measure how much they adhere to their prescribed diabetic diet and monitor their blood sugars, use insulin, etc.  Using that information, we are better able to make a recommendation on how to improve their health outcome.  I was a little nervous at first, but I’m gradually getting a little more comfortable with interviewing patients.

Today I was also able to write two patient notes and enter them into the complex computer system that the hospital has.  Unlike where I used to volunteer,  this hospital doesn’t write standard notes; they enter data into a sort of database that generates a note for them!  It’s extremely efficient if you know what you are doing…which is what I’m working on for now!  It takes a while to get used to, but I’m sort of getting the hang of it.  Practice makes perfect, right?

There are many parts to a nutrition note: assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring/evaluation.  My job is to scour the doctors’ and nurses’ notes for relevant information such as height, weight, general appearance, diagnosis, past medical history, and medications.  Then, I go and speak to the patients about their habits.  Next, I make a nutrition diagnosis using the American Dietetic Association standardized language, which for now I have to look up in a book until I become more familiar with it.  It goes: “(problem) related to (etiology) as evidenced by (signs/symptoms).”  Then I decide what intervention needs to be done, such as their caloric and protein needs, and which kind of hospital diet they should be assigned.  Last, I set goals and describe how to monitor them.

It took my whole day to do two patients; by the end of the rotation I’ll be able to do 5-6 complex patients per day!  Although we’ve been focusing a lot on diabetes, soon we’ll change the focus to oncology, then to cardiology.